Skip to main content
Latest:
Loading...
Englich - Your Choice Way Sinhala - Your Choice Way

Hisense Roku TV (B7120UK) Review

Hisense and Roku's latest collaboration is superlative, and could have big implications for the future of budget TVs

Should I buy the Hisense Roku TV (B7120UK)?
Roku and Hisense combine to create a great budget TV that's very desirable at an outrageous price.

The Roku platform is undoubtedly the big draw here, a clear step forward from most other operating systems at this price range and making it one of the best options for TV buyers on a budget.
Price When Reviewed
  • Unavailable
Hisense and Roku have teamed up to create a seriously good budget smart TV, which has finally made its way to the UK. The Roku B7120UK is a bit of an anomaly, packaging up a wide variety of promising features into a bargain price.

The outer design is simple yet effective, and you can see Roku's influence in the remote, with the purple directional pad being a signature. It's not the only place that Roku's influence is felt, and by and large this 4K TV punches above its weight in most areas.

Price
This Roku range is the only one in the UK and it's currently only available at Argos. The exclusivity hasn't driven up prices though, with the 43-, 50-, 55- and 65in models available for remarkable prices starting at just £249 matching many budget smartphones.

We've tested the 55in model, which is just £329, an obscene price for what's being offered up. The entire range is available from Argos in the UK.

TVs from Polaroid and Bush are available for under £500 but didn't impress us very much. Hisense's own B7500 is a better rival.

Check our best smart TV chart to see what your other options are.

Design & Build
While the design on this TV is nothing to write home about, it still looks fairly classy for a budget television. The design, familiar to anyone who has glimpsed a Hisense TV before, keeps things simple and it's kind of elegant.

On the back, there is a mess of protruding boxy segments and the casing has some serious ribbing. However, all being well you should have this wedged up against a wall anyway, so you'll never have to actually look at or acknowledge your new TV's darker side. In exchange for this, you get a USB port, three HDMI 2.0 ports, and also sockets for headphones, composite, optical and ethernet.
It's unlikely you'll want to regularly move a 55in TV, but it is remarkably light and was easy for me to get set up, at just 13kg for the TV and stand. The feet, my least favourite design feature, were easy to attach with the provided screws, and felt sturdy enough after that stage. However, the way that they are angled - moving from inside to outside - made them a pain to fit on my TV stand, and were just generally a little unsightly.

The remote is clean. It's rounded and feels chunkier than many remotes, but the buttons are well spaced out, with specialised buttons for Netflix, Spotify, Google Play, the Freeview Play catch-up app and Rakuten TV.

User Interface
Roku's UI is pretty incredible, from the setup process all the way to how easy it is just to fire the TV up to watch a movie on Netflix or have a few rounds of FIFA 20. If you've used any of Roku's streaming boxes or sticks then it will be familiar.

It's hard to find a single notable flaw in Roku's interface or experience, because it often just works. This is great news, as budget TVs have often been lumbered with budget operating systems, and despite being a common choice in the price range, Android TV can often be quite a frustrating experience.
Roku isn't the best: I still have a fondness for the WebOS found on LG TVs, and Samsung's range of exclusive apps have rightfully won it fans, but at this price point Roku feels like the most solid offering.

This means that many of Roku's strengths are the TVs strengths, too: using the TV is reliable and simple, the icons are well-organised and easy to navigate, and it's hands-down better to use than many other smart TV experiences.

Picture Quality
This TV has a 4K panel, but can also handle anything HD you throw at it. On the 55in screen (other sizes available), upscaling seemed to be a little light for HD content, and the image wasn't as sharp as perhaps I might have wanted, with some fuzzy edges. If you're still gaming on a PS4 or Xbox One instead of their 4K siblings, you might notice.

Otherwise, it's not so bad. There's very little noise or artefacts. The TV does fine at pulling in colour, even for the SDR (standard dynamic range) sources, which will be pretty much everything that doesn't boast about having HDR (high dynamic range), although when using Cinema mode the colour output is flattened out, leaving things looking a little fuzzy and washed out.

If you're using this for SDR content, you might have some luck by using the Standard colour mode, which bumps the contrast up but doesn't amp the colours up to retina-scorching levels.

For 4K / HDR sources, things are great. The picture quality is impressive, with formidable quality for the price you're paying. You expect extra sharpness with a 4K screen, but the HDR processing here seems to bump it up: watching John Wick and the sequel in 4K delivered great performance whether it had fight scenes in darker rooms or neon-lit clubs.
Better yet, the fur on John Wick's dog(s) looked natural and fluffy, whereas some sets can make the texture look sharp and overprocessed. Again, the default setting here is probably fine for most.

While the picture quality can't match the top-end premium sets from the likes of Sony and Samsung, it's astounding for the money, and a must-see if you're looking for a set in this price range.

Gaming is a breeze. Response time is <50ms, which doesn't say much, but I found playing DOOM looked great and I wasn't having any trouble with near-instant reactions. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare similarly looked great, and both were played in 4K HDR.

Sound Quality
Roku's set has a few different audio settings, which was a pleasant surprise. I often struggle to pick up spoken words when things get loud - meaning I'm constantly reading subtitles. This TV has a speech mode which brings up voices and pushes other noise into the background. If you're going the other way, there's a Theatre mode which will boost up other frequencies for a cinema-esque experience.

Sound isn't incredible from the two fairly basic 8W drivers, but it's hard to really fault it, too. Given the choice, you'll want to connect a soundbar, but there are ample connections on the back of the TV to enable this and really, if we're being honest, you should probably use a soundbar to get the best out of even more expensive sets. However, in the meantime, the TV will serve you fine.

Verdict
TVs under £500 generally aren’t great and are often worth actively avoiding, but this Hisense is a worthy exception.

Its picture is perfectly capable with most content in native 4K or upscaled HD, and it even makes a fine stab at demanding HDR content.

Rarer still is a budget TV that offers a good smart operating system, and this is where the Roku software really makes a difference. Put it together and you’ve got a pretty unbeatable proposition.

Specs
  • Screen size/resolution: 55in, 3840 x 2160 pixels
  • HDR: HDR10, HLG
  • Contrast ratio: 4000:1
  • Brightness: 300 nits
  • Speakers: 2x 8W
  • Audio Support: Dolby Audio, DTS Studio Sound
  • Built-in tuner: Freeview Play DVB-T2/T
  • Streaming services: Netflix, BBC iPlayer, ITV Hub, Demand 5, 4OD, Amazon Prime, YouTube
  • Inputs: 3 x HDMI 2.0 (one ARC), Composite (AV), Outputs: Digital audio optical, headphone jack
  • Networking: 10/100 Ethernet, Dual-band 802.11ac Wi-Fi
  • Ports and slots: 2 x USB 2.0, CI slot
  • Physical dimensions (w stand): 1242 × 277 × 781mm
  • Weight w/stand: 13kg, w/o stand: 12.5kg
  • Energy rating: A+
  • Warranty: 2 years


View the original article here

Comments

Populat Posts Last 7 Days

Chris Brown/Young Thug - Slime&B Music Album Reviews

Rap’s trickster god and R&B’s least tolerable person collaborate on a mixtape with no discernible upside. 
Of the many strange pop-culture artifacts to emerge from quarantine, a collaboration between Young Thug and Chris Brown probably falls higher on the plausibility index than Beyoncé shouting out OnlyFans or the name X Æ A-12, but their new mixtape, Slime&B, still feels beyond explanation. It’s hard to imagine it existing in a world less dystopian than the one we’re in now. The title implies a meeting of the minds and a marrying of their styles, yet this is a clear mismatch. Brown, while still commercially viable, has been slumping creatively. Thug is at the height of his success and near the peak of his powers. To work with Brown, Thug must sacrifice a ton of what makes him special and engaging. Why go from So Much Fun to so little?

How to Setup an AddMeFast Bot With iMacros

Introduction AddMeFast is a website where you can collect points for various social media tasks. These mostly include following accounts, liking tweets or viewing YouTube videos. Register Now - addMeFast

Strawberry Cheesecake Trifle

Strawberry Cheesecake Trifle is a delicious dessert featuring layers of angel food cake, fluffy sweetened cream cheese, and fresh strawberries in a sweet strawberry glaze. It’s easy to throw together and perfect for your next summer dinner party. Follow these keys to success for stellar results every time.

ෆජ් අයිසින් (Fudge Icing)

කෑම ලන්තයෙන් අද ඔබට ෆජ් අයිසින් තැවරූ චොකලට් කේක් එකක් සාදන ආකාරය පිළිබඳව දැනුවත් කිරිමටයි මේ සුදානම.
කේක් කිව්ව ගමන් මතකයට එන්නේ චොක්ලට් කේක්. වැඩි දෙනෙක්ගේ කැමැත්ත තියෙන්නේ චොක්ලට් කේක් කන්නයි. චොක්ලට් අයිසින් කේක් නම් තවත් හොදයි. චොක්ලට් අයිසින් කේක් හදද්දී තමයි මේ ෆජ් අයිසින් එක භාවිතයට ගන්නේ. චොක්ලට් අයිසින් එක ලස්සනට දිලිසේනවානම් ඒ තමයි ෆජ් අයිසින්. කේක් කියන්නේ හොද ස්වයං රැකියාවක්. කේක් වර්ග වගේම අයිසින් වර්ගත් මෙහිදී ඕන වෙනවා. හොද ලාභදායි ස්වයං රැකියාවක් විදිහට කේක් හදනවනම් මේ හැමදේම දැනගෙන ඉන්න ඕනේ.ඒ නිසා කෑම ලන්තයෙන් ෆජ් අයිසින් පිලිබදව ඔබව දැනුවත් කිරීම සදහා සුදානම්ව සිටිනවා. එසේනම් අපි බලමු ෆජ් අයිසින් සාදාගන්නා ආකාරය.
අවශ්‍ය ද්‍රව්‍ය: කුකින් චොක්ලට් ග්‍රෑම් 250වැනිලා තේ හැඳි 1අයිසින් සීනි මේස හැඳි 1ෆ්‍රෙෂ් ක්‍රීම් කෝප්ප 1/4

Apple MacBook Air (2020) Review

The MacBook Air finally gets the keyboard and pricing it deserves, reclaiming its crown as the best MacBook for most people in 2020. But performance and battery life could be better
Should I Buy The Apple MacBook Air (2020)? Pros Superb keyboardApple’s free appsGreat display Cons Only two USB-C portsBattery life not as advertisedGarbage webcam Our Verdict With a brilliant keyboard and solid performance, the entry level MacBook Air is once again the best Apple laptop for most people despite the battery life taking a hit if you don’t use Apple’s apps.